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DePaul University has nine modalities that define how a course is taught. These course modalities are described on the Teaching Commons website.These modalities are explained from a student perspective in a video here.

Six of these modalities take place on campus. Three modalities take place fully online.

For Fall, the College of Business will utilize four of those modalities:
Mode On-Campus
On-Campus Yes
Hybrid Yes (50% in-class, 50% online)
Online Asynchronous No (fully online)
Online Hybrid No (fully online)
Online Synchronous No (fully online)
On-Campus Alternating Yes
On-Campus Plus Zoom Yes (requires Zoom-enabled or Trimodal room)
On-Campus Alternating plus Zoom Yes (requires Zoom-enabled or Trimodal room)
On-Campus Plus Asynchronous with Zoom Option Yes (requires Zoom-enabled or Trimodal room)

Online Asynchronous

Online Asynchronous, previously known as “Online: Async,” is a modality entirely taught online. This is the common format for College of Business online courses.

So what does asynchronous mean? Synchronous events are live, versus asynchronous events which are prerecorded.

Main Features

The main features of Online Asynchronous are:

  • No meeting dates or times in Peoplesoft / Campus Connect
  • Pre-recorded content - no live required content
  • Weekly deadlines - students can work at their own pace during the week.
  • Flexible scheduling for exams - students are not expected to take their on a fixed day and time.
  • Optional synchronous meetups recommended to build presence

We strenuously advise against using Zoom for live lectures, unless the majority of time is student participation. However, Zoom can be an excellent way to add presence through office hours, student to student group participation, or checking in with your students. You can use Doodle to determine ideal time to meet.

The core to providing good online learning is understanding student needs—principally, convenience. Students are looking for their online experience to be convenient. That is the prism through which that experience will be judged. Their lives are messy and complicated, and this is why they opted for an online course of program. Scheduling live events does not make their lives more convenient, unless the live event provides clear utility and value that could not take place asynchronously.

To put this in context, we surveyed students via the Online Teaching Evaluations during the Spring quarter of 2020. Entirely asynchronous courses were the most preferred modalities for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Driehaus Online Starter Pack

We have created a D2L template that may be helpful for faculty who have not taught online before. If you would like this template copied to your D2L courses:

  1. Go to the D2L Request Forms.
  2. Click on "Copy Course Content."
  3. In the “If your course is not available in the dropdown, type as much course information as you can recall in the box below” textbox, type “Driehaus Online Starter Pack.”
  4. Select the course you want to Copy Into.
  5. Click on “Submit."
  6. On the next page, verify that the information you have provided is correct, and then click on “Submit."

The "Driehaus Online Starter Pack” contains:

  • Welcome message to students.
  • Resources for instructors.
  • Panopto instructions for instructors.
  • Online student resources (academic, technology, software, library, etc.).
  • Example syllabus.
  • Example schedule.
  • Discussion board introductions and Q&A.

The template reiterates appropriate online design. Creating a modular course, in which all weekly materials are found in that module, rather than disparate parts of the course.

At the start of each weekly module provide an introduction. In the introduction, explain what will be covered that week (and why it is important). Then share the weekly deliverables, Explain when and how these should be submitted (and you can hyperlink to the appropriate submissions folders or discussion boards as you do this). Then share the content and exercises. To help your students allocate time, indicate how long these activities should take.

It is good practice to separate your syllabus and schedule into two webpages in D2L. Your syllabus will be viewed infrequently - typically at the beginning and end of your course. However, the schedule will be something that students will frequently refer to.

Our template contains a structured syllabus that can be adapted to faculty needs.

Avoid placing these documents (and others) as PDFs. PDFs are difficult to read on mobile devices. Our hope is that an online course is more than a collection of documents. Creating pages inside D2L allows you to link to resources within your course - you cannot do this with Word documents or PDFs.

Instead, all content within an online course should be HTML. HTML is easy & quick to update, the text reformats is the user needs to change font size. HTML works on all devices, and more importantly works with screenreaders.

Our template has a biography page. Editing this page with your information and a photograph will help your students have a better understand of who you are, and your teaching philosophy.

You may want to rethink deadlines. There is little value in scheduling a deadline just before midnight, unless you are planning to grade at midnight. Instead, schedule your assignment deadlines for the time you intend to grade. That way you are ready to respond to last-minute questions as they arrive from your students, and you provide your students with more time to work on those assignments.

The D2L template for Business Faculty (The Driehaus Online Starter Pack) can help in creating presence. The homepage is a place that you can share news. You can also add Youtube videos and links to resources. We recommend that you post the same email notifications you send to your students on your D2L homepage as well. If students miss your email messages, they will see the messages when they visit your D2L course.

In some asynchronous courses you may find yourself sending multiple emails to your students each week. Without regular reminders, your students may procrastinate.

Using the discussion boards will help provide additional reasons for your students to frequent your online course, particularly if you add discussion boards for fun topics or Q&A. Setting reminders to check the discussion board regularly is good practice.

To make the job of teaching a little more efficient, we suggest that students post questions to the discussion board rather than emailing the professor (unless the question is personal or embarrassing). This results in fewer duplicate questions asking about deadlines or clarifications, but also means that students who might be reticent in reaching out can take advantage of seeing what others are asking.

If you are using a textbook, we highly recommend that you import the publishers test bank into your course. Using these questions as weekly quizzes can add significant value to your course.

  1. Log into your course in D2L.
  2. Click on “Course Administration” then “Import/Export/Copy Components.”
  3. Select “Import Components” and click on “Start.”
  4. Click and drag your file into the Upload area.
  5. Click “Import All Components.” The import will process and the bank will now appear in the Question Library.

Video

Students are particularly appreciative of short but instructive videos in your course. You can take advantage of LinkedIn Learning to add video assets to your course.

But students most appreciate well-designed videos from their instructor. With an educational video you don’t need to be on camera all the time. Richard E. Mayer’s research suggests that a constant presence on camera can be a distraction to the student, so only include yourself if your nonverbal communication and presence truly adds value. Or you can record a weekly introductory video with you on screen, but remove your webcam video from the instructional videos that you create. Videos explaining homework and providing feedback are very helpful to students.

Assessments

In the College of Business, many courses ends with assessments. For the College of Business we recommend these four options:

  1. Takehome: Give a week for students to upload to D2L Submissions.
  2. D2L Quiz: Timed exam, available for a week.
  3. Presentation: Recorded in Panopto, Voicethread.
    • If students have another option that works, let them use that.
  4. Project: Upload to D2L Submissions.

Respondus Monitor

Instructions on how to use Respondus Monitor can be found on the Teaching Commons website.

There are three ways DePaul faculty can implement Respondus Monitor:

  1. Read the Teaching Commons instructions and then make the changes in D2L.
  2. Ask FITS to enable Respondus Monitor on an existing D2L quiz via the request form
  3. Ask FITS to help setting up a new quiz and then enable Respondus Monitor via the request form.

Getting Help

If you need technical help during the quarter, please email FITS@depaul.edu.

If your students have technical issues, please direct them to the Helpdesk at helpdesk.depaul.edu

Training, documentation and resources can all be found online at go.depaul.edu/remote-teaching

Online Hybrid

Online Hybrid is a modality entirely taught online. This has not been the common format for College of Business online courses. This format combines asynchronous and synchronous.

So what does synchronous and asynchronous mean? Synchronous events are live, versus asynchronous events which are prerecorded.

Main Features

The main features of Online Hybrid are:

  • Meeting dates and times in Peoplesoft / Campus Connect
  • Pre-recorded lecture content
  • Live scheduled interaction with students (via Zoom)
  • Weekly deadlines
  • Optional synchronous meetups recommended to build presence

Weekly Zoom Meetings

The live scheduled interaction with students should not be pure lecture - that would be a waste of time for you and your students. Ideally, 80% of the time spent during a weekly Zoom meeting should be the students talking, and 20 % of the time spent with the professor talking. These synchronous sessions are an opportunity for students to ask questions, collaborate in small groups, or to participate in a seminar.

  • These synchronous Zoom sessions should be no more than 90 minutes but can be shorter.
  • Faculty can tell students to take a break and come back later (within the 90-minute duration).
  • Group work is possible via Zoom Breakout rooms.
  • The meeting times in Campus Connect are fixed - the cannot be changed by faculty.
  • For example, a traditional in-class course might meet each week for three hours Monday nights from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. The equivalent Online Hybrid course would meet in Zoom from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. each Monday.
An Online Hybrid course is an Online Asynchronous course with weekly meetings of up to 90 minutes. The weekly meetings are for live interaction between students and their professor.

Getting Help

If you need technical help during the quarter, please email FITS@depaul.edu.

If your students have technical issues, please direct them to the Helpdesk at helpdesk.depaul.edu

Training, documentation and resources can all be found online at go.depaul.edu/remote-teaching

On-Campus Alternating

On-Campus Alternating is a modality taught on campus face-to-face. This format is designed to accommodate social distancing in the classroom.

Main Features

  • Meeting dates and times in Peoplesoft / Campus Connect
  • Taught in a regular DePaul classroom, with social distancing
  • Two sections for the course:
    • The sections meet alternating times with their professor
  • Some lecture material will have to take place asynchronously in D2L
  • Midterms and final exams can take place in the classroom

With social distancing, DePaul classrooms can only accommodate a smaller number of students. A classroom that normally could accommodate 50 students may now accommodate 15 students. For an On-Campus Alternating course, we might split the 30 enrolled students into two sections: A and B.

For a three-hour class. such as the ones that might meet from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m., each section meets with the professor in the classroom five times over a ten-week period. The sections alternate. Students cannot change their assigned meeting patterns.

For a 90-minute class. such as the ones that might meet Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m., each section meets with the professor in the classroom ten times over a ten-week period. The sections alternate. Students cannot change their assigned meeting patterns.

Flipped Classroom

An On-Campus Alternating course utilizes the flipped classroom. With reduced classroom time, asynchronous content in D2L is required.

That asynchronous content may work best as prerecorded Panopto video in D2L.

Getting Help

If you need technical help during the quarter, please email FITS@depaul.edu.

If your students have technical issues, please direct them to the Helpdesk at helpdesk.depaul.edu

Training, documentation and resources can all be found online at go.depaul.edu/remote-teaching

On-Campus Alternating plus Zoom

On-Campus Alternating plus Zoom is a modality taught on campus face-to-face. This format is designed to accommodate social distancing in the classroom, and simultaneously connect remote students via Zoom. This modality requires either a Zoom-equipped classroom or a Trimodal classroom.

Main Features

  • Meeting dates and times in Peoplesoft / Campus Connect
  • Taught in a Zoom-equipped or Trimodal classroom, with social distancing
  • Three sections for the course:
    • Two sections meet alternating times with their professor
    • One section never visits the physical classroom - connects via Zoom
  • Classes could be recorded
  • Remote students cannot take exams in the classroom

With social distancing, DePaul classrooms can only accommodate a smaller number of students. A classroom that normally could accommodate 50 students may now accommodate 15 students. For an On-Campus Alternating plus Zoom course, we might split the 45 enrolled students into three sections: A, B, and C.

For a three-hour class. such as the ones that might meet from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m., sections A and B meets with the professor in the classroom five times over a ten-week period. The sections alternate. Students cannot change their assigned meeting patterns. When sections A and B are not in the physical classroom, they connect live via Zoom. A third section, C, connects exclusively via Zoom. This modality is taught in either a Zoom-equipped classroom or a Trimodal classroom.

Trimodal Classrooms

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The Trimodal classrooms are a recent development at DePaul.

For Fall, there should be at least six Trimodal classrooms at the Loop campus. Five classrooms are to be used by all colleges. The College of Business has a dedicated Trimodal classroom on the fifth floor of the DePaul Center (DPC 5901).

The trimodal layout has at least four screens in the classroom - two that students see at the front of the classroom, and two that the professor sees at the back of the classroom. The “presenter’s content” screen is a touch screen, as is the PC monitor on the podium. Two cameras (one at the front, one at the back) film the classroom environment. The professor and students can see and interact with the remote students via Zoom on the “remote students” screen. Soundbars at the front and back of the classroom to capture room audio.

Zoom Classrooms

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The Zoom classroom layout is simpler than a Trimodal classroom, but can be upgraded to Trimodal in the future. There are fewer screens in the room, and only one camera at the back of the room. Two monitors are available for the professor to see on the podium in the room. A ceiling-mounted microphone captures audio in the classroom.

The two monitors on the podium allow the professor to present content and to administer the Zoom session. Monitor 1 is a touchscreen - faculty can present and annotate content with a stylus) or their finger. Monitor 2 is a regular screen, and displays the Zoom session. The professor can see the remote students here, along with chat comments and list of participants.

The touchscreen is mounted on an articulated arm. This allows the professor to place the touchscreen at a convenient angle for writing on with the stylus.

For remote students to see written content, the professor cannot use the regular whiteboard or blackboard in the classroom.

The touchscreen on the podium is where the professor should write, draw, and annotate. This content will be seen by both the students in the classroom and the remote students.

Getting Help

If you need technical help during the quarter, please email FITS@depaul.edu.

If your students have technical issues, please direct them to the Helpdesk at helpdesk.depaul.edu

Training, documentation and resources can all be found online at go.depaul.edu/remote-teaching
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