Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Technology Tuesday: Google Wave


This presentation is available in two formats:








OoyalaYou can view the Ooyala video version by pressing the play button above. The video is also available on YouTube.
Presentation in iPod FormatAlternatively, you can download the video as a M4V file. This version will play in iTunes, QuickTime and on iPods, iPhones and Apple TVs.

iTunes is a free download that will work on both Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X.

You are recommended to download and print the accompanying presentation handout (PDF).

What Is Google Wave?

E-mail is old... e-mail has been around since 1971 when Ray Tomlinson developed a hack to transfer files over ARPANET (the network that evolved into what we now call the Internet ). He says it took him about six hours to create — in his spare time. E-mail has not changed too dramatically over the years; this simplicity may be one of the reasons for its ubiquity. However, e-mail has inherent flaws, such as:
  • E-mail promotes the distribution of duplicate attachments, rather than sharing from a centralized repository.
  • E-mail supports limited content types.
  • E-mail does not scale well with multiple recipients and multiple messages.

Google Wave grew out of the question “What would e-mail look like if it were invented today?” As such, it is a real-time collaborative tool that assembles the elements of IM (Instant Message), Wikis, Google Docs and e-mail into one interface. Initially you may find it a little confusing to use, but Google Wave has the potential to usurp older methods of communication.

The inventors of Google Wave (Lars and Jens Rasmussen, who also created Google Maps) are science fiction geeks, and the Wave name was inspired by the television series “Firefly.” In Firefly’s universe, communication took place via “wave.” Hence the name.

Wave is a protocol, in the same way the HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is a protocol. HTTP allows netizens to create webpages and surf the Web. When Tim Berners-Lee gave HTTP and the Web to the Internet community, this transformed the world — and the way we communicate. Perhaps Google Wave may have a similar influence. Google is developing Wave, but this technology is not proprietary — others can develop the three elements of Google Wave:

  1. Protocol
    The Google Wave protocol is an open extension to the Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP)
  2. Server
  3. Client
    Google Wave currently runs in the browser, but dedicated clients could be created.

How Do You Get a Google Wave Account?

There are two ways to get a Google Wave account (something that looks like jmoore.depaul@googlewave.com):

  1. Request an invitation from http://wave.google.com
  2. Ask someone you know on Google Wave for an invitation.

Option two is generally the quickest way to get an invitation. Typically, you may have to wait a week for your invitation to come through. This will be sent from the the account wave-noreply@google.com. You may have to check your spam filter to ensure that this message arrives successfully.

Running Google Wave

Google currently recommends three browsers for running Google Wave:

  1. Google Chrome
    http://www.google.com/chrome
  2. Firefox
    http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/
    For a better experience, install Google Gears:
    http://gears.google.com
  3. Safari
    http://www.apple.com/safari/
    Google Gears currently does not install on OS X Snow Leopard

Mobile Devices

Google Wave will run on the iPhone (if you ignore the error message), on the Palm Pre (with a hack to make the browser to report as Mobile Safari) and on Android mobile telephones.

Google Wave Interface

Google Wave’s interface is fairly straightforward - with 4 primary panes:

  1. Navigation
  2. Contacts
  3. Inbox
  4. Conversation

Google Wave Structure

Google Wave operates by using Wavelets. A Wavelet is a container for:

  • Participants
    Each wave has one of more participants:
    • Humans
      Wave users.
    • Robots (Extension)
      Robots are automated agents that perform a specific function, such as providing poll results or linking usernames to Twitter.
    • Public
      Adding public@a.gwave.com to a wave makes that wave public.
  • Blips
    Blips are the individual messages within a wave. A blip can contain another blip.
    • Gadgets (Extension)
      Gadgets are mini-applications that run within the browser, such as:
      • Google Search
      • Yes / No / Maybe
      • Google Maps
      • Ribbit Conference Call
      • 6 Rounds Video Chat
      • Lonely Planet Trip Planning
      • AccuWeather
      • Sudoku
  • Documents
    Documents are attached to blips.

Ramifications

Google Wave has just been launched. The product may enter history as one of Google’s interesting experiments, or it may take off. If Google Wave is a success, then there are some possible outcomes:

  • Existing e-mail services are replaced.
  • Users migrate from social networks.
  • Wave becomes the new standard for online collaboration.
  • Wave becomes new standard for project management.
  • Integration with Learning Management Systems (or replaces Learning Management Systems).

Internet Resources

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Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Technology Tuesday: Blackboard Makeover


This presentation is available in three formats:

Ooyala You can view the Ooyala video version by pressing the play button above.
Presentation in iPod Format Alternatively, you can download the video as a M4V file. This version will play in iTunes, QuickTime and on iPods, iPhones and Apple TVs.

iTunes is a free download that will work on both Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X.

Presentation in 3G Format Lastly, you can download the presentation as a 3GP file. This file will play on mobile devices that support the Third-Generation Platform standard for mobile devices.

You are recommended to download and print the accompanying presentation handout (PDF).

Summary

Blackboard is the LMS (Learning Management System) that DePaul centrally supports for all classes. Chances are that you use Blackboard but have not explored the ways you can make your Blackboard course come alive. In this session we will cover quick and painless ways you can give your Blackboard course an Extreme Makeover – turning a plain course into something more glamorous (and pedagogically sound).

Student Resources

Instructional Technology Development (ITD)

ITD provides online and in-person training for students at DePaul.

Faculty Resouces

Information Services

Also known as IS. Responsible for the university's hardware, software, network infrastructure and telecommunications systems

Instructional Design and Development (IDD)

IDD collaborates with faculty from all schools and colleges to design, develop, and implement effective instruction. IDD Consultants provide specialized support to each of DePaul's schools. IDD has a blog which can be found at http://iddresources.org

Instructional Technology Development (ITD)

ITD provides online and in-person training for faculty at DePaul. Supported resources include Blackboard, QuickData, Respondus, Turn-It-In and more.

Office for Teaching, Learning, and Assessment

Promotes approaches to teaching and assessment that improve student learning; supports scholarly research that advances our understanding of student learning across the University; facilitates faculty sharing of teaching, learning, and assessment issues; and examines institutional policies and structures for their impact on teaching and learning.

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Thursday, May 28, 2009

Technology Tuesday: ScreenFlow


This presentation is available in three formats:


Ooyala You can view the Ooyala video version by pressing the play button above.
Presentation in iPod Format Alternatively, you can download the video as a M4V file. This version will play in iTunes, QuickTime and on iPods, iPhones and Apple TVs.

iTunes is a free download that will work on both Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X.

Presentation in 3G Format Lastly, you can download the presentation as a 3GP file. This file will play on mobile devices that support the Third-Generation Platform standard for mobile devices.

You are recommended to download and print the accompanying presentation handout (PDF).

Summary


ScreenFlow is a screencasting tool that captures live desktop video, microphone and computer audio, and video camera input (internal or external) and then allows for editing after you have finished recording. There are other similar products out there in the marketplace, but I have found ScreenFlow to be the best tool for ad-hoc lecture capture as well as creating video content for blended and online learning.


ScreenFlow is Mac OS X (Leopard) only. I consider the application to be sufficient cause to migrate from Microsoft Windows to the Apple platform.


The video and session handout presents quick and easy way to create streaming and downloadable video.

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Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Technology Tuesday: Twitter


This presentation is available in three formats:


Ooyala You can view the Ooyala video version by pressing the play button above.
Presentation in iPod Format Alternatively, you can download the video as a M4V file. This version will play in iTunes, QuickTime and on iPods, iPhones and Apple TVs.

iTunes is a free download that will work on both Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X.

Presentation in 3G Format Lastly, you can download the presentation as a 3GP file. This file will play on mobile devices that support the Third-Generation Platform standard for mobile devices.

You are recommended to download and print the accompanying presentation handout (PDF).

Summary

Twitter is the microblogging service in which users tweet short (140 character) messages over the Internet. Twitter is a service used by millions but misunderstood by an even greater number.


In this Technology Tuesday session you will learn what Twitter is, but more importantly how you and your students can use Twitter to enhance learning, research and networking.


Twitter is being used at DePaul for classes and communication. Find out what you need to know about this exciting social media phenomenon.


Additional Resources



Twitter at DePaul


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Friday, April 3, 2009

Technology Tuesday: Filming in the Classroom


This presentation is available in three formats:

Ooyala You can view the Ooyala video version by pressing the play button above.
Presentation in iPod Format Alternatively, you can download the video as a M4V file. This version will play in iTunes, QuickTime and on iPods, iPhones and Apple TVs.

iTunes is a free download that will work on both Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X.

Presentation in 3G Format Lastly, you can download the presentation as a 3GP file. This file will play on mobile devices that support the Third-Generation Platform standard for mobile devices.

You are recommended to download and print the accompanying presentation handout (PDF).

Summary

Relatively inexpensive video camcorders like the Flip Mino provide the opportunity for faculty to film in the classroom. In this video I look at three video camcorders (the Creative Labs Vado HD 720p, Flip Mino and Kodak Zi6) and suggest which device is best to use. I also cover some of tripod options to consider.

Rick Salisbury (IDD) has also put together some recommendations for filming with the Flip.

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Friday, January 30, 2009

Technology Tuesday: EditGrid

This presentation is available in three formats:


OoyalaYou can view the Ooyaal video version by pressing the play button above.
Presentation in iPod FormatAlternatively, you can download the video as a M4V file. This version will play in iTunes, QuickTime and on iPods, iPhones and Apple TVs.
        

iTunes is a free download that will work on both Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X.

Presentation in 3G FormatLastly, you can download the presentation as a 3GP file. This file will play on mobile devices that support the Third-Generation Platform standard for mobile devices.
  

You are recommended to download and print the accompanying presentation handout (PDF).

Summary

EditGrid is an online web-based spreadsheet application  that lets you  publish working spreadsheets directly into Blackboard. Rick Salisbury from IDD will demo Editgrid and show how you can incorporate it into your online courses. This session will explain:    

  • How to setup up an Editgrid account and upload your  Excel files 
  • How to embed spreadsheets into Blackboard
  • How to use Editgrid’s remote data feature to create spreadsheets with real-time data such as stock quotes, foreign exchange rates, and other web data.

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